How the Test Is Scored

GRE revised General Test (tests taken on or after August 1, 2011)
GRE General Test (tests taken prior to August 1, 2011)

 GRE® revised General Test
(tests taken on or after August 1, 2011)

GRE revised General Test Score Scales

Three scores are reported on the GRE® revised General Test:

  • a Verbal Reasoning score reported on a 130–170 score scale, in 1-point increments
  • a Quantitative Reasoning score reported on a 130–170 score scale, in 1-point increments
  • an Analytical Writing score reported on a 0–6 score scale, in half-point increments

Any section in which you answer no questions at all will be reported as a No Score (NS).

Computer-delivered Test

For the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning measures of the computer-delivered GRE revised General Test, the reported scores are based on the number of correct responses to all the questions included in the operational sections of the measure.

The Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning measures are section-level adaptive. This means the computer selects the second operational section of a measure based on your performance on the first section. Within each section, all questions contribute equally to the final score. For each of the two measures, a raw score is computed. The raw score is the number of questions you answered correctly.

The raw score is converted to a scaled score through a process known as equating. The equating process accounts for minor variations in difficulty among the different test editions as well as the differences in difficulty introduced by the section-level adaptation. Thus a given scaled score for a particular measure reflects the same level of performance regardless of which second section was selected and when the test was taken.

For the Analytical Writing section, each essay receives a score from at least one trained reader, using a six-point holistic scale. In holistic scoring, readers are trained to assign scores on the basis of the overall quality of an essay in response to the assigned task. The essay score is then reviewed by e-rater®, a computerized program developed by ETS, which is used to monitor the human reader. If the e-rater evaluation and the human score agree, the human score is used as the final score. If they disagree by a certain amount, a second human score is obtained, and the final score is the average of the two human scores.

The final scores on the two essays are then averaged and rounded to the nearest half-point interval on the 0–6 score scale. A single score is reported for the Analytical Writing measure. The primary emphasis in scoring the Analytical Writing section is on your critical thinking and analytical writing skills rather than on grammar and mechanics. Read the "Issue" and "Argument" scoring guides below.

During the scoring process, your essay responses on the Analytical Writing section will be reviewed by ETS essay-similarity-detection software and by experienced essay readers. See Independent Intellectual Activity.

Paper-delivered Test

For the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning sections of the paper-delivered GRE revised General Test, a raw score is computed. The raw score is the number of questions answered correctly.

The raw score is then converted to a scaled score through a process known as equating. The equating process accounts for differences in difficulty among the different test editions. Thus, a given scaled score for a particular measure reflects the same level of ability, regardless of the edition of the test that was taken.

For the Analytical Writing section, each essay receives a score from two trained readers, using a six-point holistic scale. In holistic scoring, readers are trained to assign scores on the basis of the overall quality of an essay in response to the assigned task. If the two assigned scores differ by more than one point on the scale, the discrepancy is adjudicated by a third GRE reader. Otherwise, the two scores on each essay are averaged.

The final scores on the two essays are then averaged and rounded to the nearest half-point interval on the 0–6 score scale. A single score is reported for the Analytical Writing measure. The primary emphasis in scoring the Analytical Writing section is on your critical thinking and analytical writing skills rather than on grammar and mechanics. Read the "Issue" and "Argument" scoring guides below.

During the scoring process, your essay responses on the Analytical Writing section will be reviewed by ETS essay-similarity-detection software and by experienced essay readers. See Independent Intellectual Activity.

 GRE® General Test
(tests taken prior to August 1, 2011)

GRE General Test Score Scales

Three scores are reported on the GRE® General Test:

  • a Verbal Reasoning score reported on a 200–800 score scale, in 10-point increments
  • a Quantitative Reasoning score reported on a 200–800 score scale, in 10-point increments
  • an Analytical Writing score reported on a 0–6 score scale, in half-point increments

Any section in which you answer no questions at all will be reported as a No Score (NS).

Computer-delivered Test

Your scores on the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning sections of the computer-delivered GRE General Test were determined by your performance on the questions given and on the number of questions answered in the time allotted.

These sections were computer-adaptive, which means the questions presented were selected to reflect your performance on preceding questions and meet the requirements of the test design. Test design factors that influenced which questions were presented to you included:

  • the statistical characteristics (including difficulty level) of the questions already answered
  • the required variety of question types
  • the appropriate coverage of content

For the computer-delivered Analytical Writing section, each essay received a score from at least one trained reader, using a six-point holistic scale. In holistic scoring, readers are trained to assign scores on the basis of the overall quality of an essay in response to the assigned task. The essay score was then reviewed by e-rater, a computerized program developed by ETS, which was being used to monitor the human reader. If the e-rater evaluation and the human score agree, the human score was used as the final score. If they disagree by a certain amount, a second human score was obtained, and the final score was the average of the two human scores.

The final scores on the two essays were then averaged and rounded up to the nearest half-point interval. A single score is reported for the Analytical Writing section.

The primary emphasis in scoring the Analytical Writing section was on your critical thinking and analytical writing skills rather than on grammar and mechanics. Read the "Issue" and "Argument" scoring guides below.

During the scoring process, your essay responses on the Analytical Writing section were reviewed by ETS essay-similarity-detection software and by experienced essay readers. See Independent Intellectual Activity.

Paper-delivered Test

For the Verbal and Quantitative sections of the paper-delivered GRE General Test, a raw score was computed. The raw score is the number of questions for which the best answer choice was given.

The raw score was then converted to a scaled score through a process known as equating. The equating process accounts for differences in difficulty among the different test editions. Thus, a given scaled score for a particular measure reflects the same level of ability, regardless of the edition of the test that was taken.

For the Analytical Writing section, each essay received a score from two trained readers, using a six-point holistic scale. In holistic scoring, readers are trained to assign scores on the basis of the overall quality of an essay in response to the assigned task. If the two assigned scores differ by more than one point on the scale, the discrepancy was adjudicated by a third GRE reader.

Otherwise, the scores from the two readings of an essay were averaged and rounded up to the nearest half-point interval. A single score is reported for the Analytical Writing section.

The primary emphasis in scoring the Analytical Writing section was on your critical thinking and analytical writing skills rather than on grammar and mechanics.

During the scoring process, your essay responses on the Analytical Writing section were reviewed by ETS essay-similarity-detection software and by experienced essay readers. See Independent Intellectual Activity.

 

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