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(PPAT) Task 2 Deep Dive Video

People in this video:

Narrator – Dr. Cathy Owens-Oliver, Client Relations Director, ETS®

Transcript

Video duration: 18:34

Praxis® Performance Assessment for Teachers (PPAT) Task 2 Deep Dive

On Screen: [PPAT® Assessment Deep Dive into TASK 2: Assessment and Data Collection to Measure and Inform Student Learning]

Narrator: Welcome! You may already be familiar with the four tasks of the PPAT assessment, but today we’re here to take a deep dive into Task 2.

On Screen: [Purpose Ensure participants’ better understanding of:

· the main components of Task 2

· the knowledge and skills that are necessary to complete the requirements for Task 2

· EPP support for candidates]

Narrator: The purpose of this presentation is to help you better understand the main components of Task 2 and the resources available to candidates and teacher preparation programs. We hope this presentation provides a better understanding of things student teachers and teacher education faculty should consider.

On Screen: [The Structure of Task 2 Overview and Main Components]

Narrator: Let’s begin by looking closely at how Task 2 is structured.

On Screen: [The Steps in Task 2

Step 1: Planning the Assessment

Step 2: Administering the Assessment

Step 3: Reflecting]

Narrator: Task 2 is broken down into three steps. Each has an important role in moving the candidate through the required activity of planning, administering and analyzing an assessment, and then reflecting on the assessment based on the results.

On Screen: [Overview of the Structure of Task 2

Step 1

TEXTBOX

(the guiding prompts are listed below)

2.1.1

a. Provide an in-depth description of the assessment. Provide a rationale for choosing or designing the assessment based on its alignment with the standards and learning goal(s) that meet the students’ needs.

b. What data did you use to establish a baseline for student growth related to this lesson’s learning goal(s)?

c. Describe the rubric or scoring guide you have selected or designed. How does it align to your learning goal(s)? How will you communicate its use to your students?

d. What evidence of student learning do you plan to collect from the assessment? How will you collect the data? Provide a rationale for your data-collection process.

2.1.2

a. What learning activities and student groupings will you use during the assessment? Provide a rationale for your choices.

b. What materials, resources and technology will you use to administer the assessment? Provide a rationale for your choices.

2.1.3

a. Choose and describe two Focus Students who reflect different learning needs and for whom you will need to modify the assessment. Provide a rationale for selecting each of the students. Refer to them as Focus Student 1 and Focus Student 2 as you respond to the guiding prompts.

b. What data did you use to establish a baseline for growth for these two Focus Students?

c. Based on their specific learning needs, how will you modify the assessment for each of the two Focus Students? Provide a rationale for each decision.

Step 2

TEXTBOX

(the guiding prompts are listed below)

2.2.1

a. Based on your baseline data and the data shown in your graphic representation, analyze the assessment data to determine your students’ progress toward the learning goal(s).

b. How efficient was the data-collection process that you selected? Cite examples to support your analysis.

c. Describe how you engaged students in analyzing their own assessment results to help them understand their progress toward the learning goal(s).

2.2.2

a. What did you learn overall about the progress of each of the two Focus Students toward achieving the learning goal(s)? Cite evidence from each of the two Focus Students’ completed assessment and any other related data to support your analysis.

b. Based on the assessment data, both baseline and graphic, what impact did your modification(s) of the assessment have on the demonstration of learning from each of the two Focus Students? Cite examples to support your analysis.

c. Describe how you engaged each of the two Focus Students in analyzing his or her own assessment results to help understand progress made toward the learning goal(s).

Step 3

TEXTBOX

(the guiding prompts are listed below)

2.3.1

a. How will your data analysis inform or guide future instruction for the whole class?

b. What modifications to the data-collection process would you make for future use? Provide a rationale.

c. What modifications to the assessment would you make for future use? Provide a rationale.

d. In what ways would an assessment that is different from the type used in this task allow students to further demonstrate their achievement of the learning goal(s)?

2.3.2

a. Choose one successful aspect of the assessment for either Focus Student. Provide a rationale for your choice.

b. How will your data analysis inform or guide future instruction for each of the two Focus Students?

c. What modifications would you make to the assessment for future use for each of the two Focus Students? Provide a rationale.

]

Narrator: Let’s look at how these three steps are broken down.

You can see the steps I just mentioned on the left side of your screen. In the actual structure of the task, those three steps are then broken down into textboxes. Each textbox is labeled with three numbers. For example, in this series of numbers, 2.1.3, the first number (2) represents the task number (this is Task 2), the second number (1) represents the step number for this task (this is the first step in Task 2), and the last number (3) tells me that this is the third textbox within Step 1. Therefore, the textbox number is 2.1.3.

Notice that Step 1 has three textboxes.

Notice that Steps 2 and 3 each have two textboxes.

Understanding the numbering system on the tasks is helpful because the same numbering system is used on the scoring rubric.

Textboxes are important because this is where candidates present their written commentary and artifacts.

On Screen: [Overview of the Artifact Requirement of Task 2

Artifact

Maximum Number of Pages

Textbox Location

representative pages of the selected assessment

2

2.1.1

representative pages of the baseline data for the whole class

2

2.1.1

representative page of the rubric or scoring guide

1

2.1.1

representative page of the baseline data for Focus Student 1

1

2.1.3

representative page of the baseline data for Focus Student 2

1

2.1.3

representative pages of a graphic representation (e.g., spreadsheet, pie chart, table) of the collected data

2

2.2.1

a completed assessment from Focus Student 1

1

2.2.2

a completed assessment from Focus Student 2

1

2.2.2

]

Narrator: In addition to the written commentary required for each textbox, the candidate will submit artifacts for two of the steps as well: Steps 1 and 2.

Let’s take a look at the artifacts by step.

For Step 1, in the first textbox, 2.1.1, three artifacts are required (the selected assessment, the baseline data for the whole class, and the rubric and scoring guide). The number in the second column, following each artifact, signifies the maximum page limit allowed for the artifact.

For Step 1, the third textbox, 2.1.3, requires the candidate to submit two artifacts (baseline data for Focus Student 1 and baseline data for Focus Student 2).

For Step 2, textbox 2.2.1 requires one artifact (the data), and for textbox 2.2.2, two artifacts must be attached (a completed assessment from each of the two focus students).

As you can see, Step 3 does not require the attachment of any artifacts.

On Screen: [Written Commentary: Types of Writing Required in a Task

Descriptive Writing

Analytic Writing

Reflective Writing

Retells what happened, sets the scene and gives a basic sense of the situation

¾ Accurately explain

¾ Ensure people, events, and concepts are clearly described

Provides reasons, motives, interpretation supported by evidence

Reveals thought processes used to arrive at conclusions

Provides significance of the evidence submitted

Provides thought processes after completing an activity

¾ Making sense of an experience

¾ Giving perspective/clarity

¾ Showing deeper understanding

¾ Drawing conclusions that inform future practice

(an arrow points from the Analytic Writing column to the Reflective Writing column indicating there is overlap)]

Narrator: Let’s talk for a few minutes about the written commentary that candidates submit. The written commentary is the candidate’s response to the guiding prompts presented in the task requirements, and candidates will be asked to write in three different ways: descriptive, analytical and reflective.

Descriptive writing is a retelling of what happened in a school situation or event. This kind of writing is meant to set the scene for raters.

Analytical writing gives reasons, motives and interpretations of events or decisions. It allows candidates to articulate the thought processes and the rationales they used to arrive at their conclusions about a situation or event in the classroom. Analysis also demonstrates the significance of the submitted evidence and artifacts.

Reflective writing is the thought process that occurs after the completion of an activity. This is the kind of thought process that allows a candidate to think deeply about what occurred — and what did not occur — during an event or situation, and also to make decisions about how to approach similar situations in the future.

It will be helpful to keep this information in mind as candidates prepare for the written commentary portion of the task.

On Screen: [A Walk-Through Task 2 Task Requirements and Rubric]

Narrator: Now, let’s look at the Task 2 requirements and rubric.

On Screen: [Task 2 PPAT® Assessment Task Requirements

Task 2 Assessment and Data Collection to Measure and Inform Student Learning

In this task, you will demonstrate your understanding, analysis, and application of assessment and data collection to measure and inform student learning.

Standards and Indicators Measured in This Task

The following InTASC Model Core Teaching Standards represent the focus of this task.

The evidence you submit must address and will be scored according to the following.

Standard 1, Indicator a

Standard 2, Indicators b and f

Standard 6, Indicators b, c, d, g, and h

Standard 7, Indicator d

Standard 8, Indicator b

Standard 9, Indicator c

(an arrow points to the standards from a list containing:

· Learner Development

· Learning Differences

· Assessment

· Planning for Instruction

· Instructional Strategies

· Professional Learning and Ethical Practice]

Narrator: This is the first page of the Task Requirements.

On this page, we provide the focus statement of this task and the InTASC Model Core Teaching Standards and indicators with which Task 2 is aligned.

On Screen: [What Do You Have to Do for This Task?

For this task, you must submit the following evidence.

1. Written Commentary of a maximum of 22,500 characters (approximately seven typed pages) that

· responds to all parts of the guiding prompts;

· references your artifacts to support your written evidence; and

· describes, analyzes, and reflects on the evidence

2. Identification of two Focus Students who reflect different learning needs

3. Eight different artifacts (maximum of eleven pages), including

Artifact

Maximum Number of Pages

Textbox Location

representative pages of the selected assessment

2

2.1.1

representative pages of the baseline data for the whole class

2

2.1.1

representative page of the rubric or scoring guide

1

2.1.1

representative page of the baseline data for Focus Student 1

1

2.1.3

representative page of the baseline data for Focus Student 2

1

2.1.3

representative pages of a graphic representation (e.g., spreadsheet, pie chart, table) of the collected data

2

2.2.1

a completed assessment from Focus Student 1

1

2.2.2

a completed assessment from Focus Student 2

1

2.2.2

]

Narrator: Here is an overview of what the candidate must provide: a Written Commentary of no more than 22,500 characters and the identification of two focus students and eight different artifacts. The chart includes helpful details about each artifact including a description, maximum length and the textbox location.

On Screen: [Task 2 Rubric The Holistic and Analytic Parts of the Rubric]

Narrator: Now, let’s take a look at an overview of the Task 2 rubric.

On Screen: [Holistic Portion of the Rubric

Step 1: Planning the Assessment (textboxes 2.1.1, 2.1.2, and 2.1.3)

Score of 1

Score of 2

Score of 3

Score of 4

A response at the 1 level provides minimal evidence that demonstrates the teacher candidate’s ability to describe an assessment and identify how it aligns to the standards, learning goal(s), and student learning needs; to use data to establish a baseline for student growth; to describe the rubric/scoring guide, its alignment to the learning goal(s), and the communication of its use to students; to identify evidence of student learning using a data-collection method; to identify learning activities and student groupings to be used during the assessment; to identify materials, resources, and technology to be used during the assessment; to identify materials, resources, and technology to be used during the assessment; to identify two Focus Students who reflect different learning needs for whom the assessment will be modified; to use data to establish a baseline for measuring growth of these two Focus Students; and to modify the assessment based on the Focus Students’ specific learning needs.

The preponderance of evidence for the 1-level criteria is minimal and/or ineffective throughout the response for Step 1. Evidence may also be missing.

A response at the 2 levelprovides partial evidence that demonstrates the teacher candidate’s ability to describe an assessment and identify how it aligns to the standards, learning goal(s), and student learning needs; to use data to establish a baseline for student growth; to describe the rubric/scoring guide, its alignment to the learning goal(s), and the communication of its use to students; to identify evidence of student learning using a data- collection method; to identify learning activities and student groupings to be used during the assessment; to identify materials, resources, and technology to be used during the assessment; to identify materials, resources, and technology to be used during the assessment; to identify two Focus Students who reflect different learning needs for whom the assessment will be modified; to use data to establish a baseline for measuring growth of these two Focus Students; and to modify the assessment based on the Focus Students’ specific learning needs.

The preponderance of evidence for the 2-level criteria is limited and/or vague throughout the response for Step 1.

A response at the 3 level provides effective evidence that demonstrates the teacher candidate’s ability to describe an assessment and identify how it aligns to the standards, learning goal(s), and student learning needs; to use data to establish a baseline for student growth; to describe the rubric/scoring guide, its alignment to the learning goal(s), and the communication of its use to students; to identify evidence of student learning using a data- collection method; to identify learning activities and student groupings to be used during the assessment; to identify materials, resources, and technology to be used during the assessment; to identify materials, resources, and technology to be used during the assessment; to identify two Focus Students who reflect different learning needs for whom the assessment will be modified; to use data to establish a baseline for measuring growth of these two Focus Students; and to modify the assessment based on the Focus Students’ specific learning needs.

The preponderance of evidence for the 3-level criteria is appropriate and connected throughout the response for Step 1.

A response at the 4 level provides consistent evidence that demonstrates the teacher candidate’s ability to describe an assessment and identify how it aligns to the standards, learning goal(s), and student learning needs; to use data to establish a baseline for student growth; to describe the rubric/scoring guide, its alignment to the learning goal(s), and the communication of its use to students; to identify evidence of student learning using a data- collection method; to identify learning activities and student groupings to be used during the assessment; to identify materials, resources, and technology to be used during the assessment; to identify materials, resources, and technology to be used during the assessment; to identify two Focus Students who reflect different learning needs for whom the assessment will be modified; to use data to establish a baseline for measuring growth of these two Focus Students; and to modify the assessment based on the Focus Students’ specific learning needs.

The preponderance of evidence for the 4-level criteria is insightful and tightly connected throughout the response for Step 1.

(an arrow points to the section that begins: “The preponderance of evidence”)]

Narrator: The rubric has two parts: the holistic section (shown on this slide in bold) and an analytic section (found on the following slide). Ultimately, raters use the holistic section to determine the quality and completeness of a candidate’s evidence for each step. The words in italics are qualitative and distinguish the differences for each score point. For example, a score of 1 displays the characteristics of providing minimal and/or ineffective evidence. A score of 2 is limited and/or vague. A score of 3 is appropriate and connected. And a score of 4 is insightful and thoroughly connected.

Teacher candidates should become very familiar with this document when drafting their written commentary and selecting artifacts.

On Screen: [Analytic Portion of the Rubric

Score of 1

Score of 2

Score of 3

Score of 4

Response provides evidence that includes the following:

• a disconnected assessment, with minimal description, based on its alignment with standards, learning goal(s), and student needs

irrelevant data used as a baseline for student growth and related to the learning goal(s) of the lesson

• selection of a rubric/scoring guide that is disconnected from the learning goal(s) and minimal communication of its use to students

• an illogical choice of and rationale for a data-collection method to show evidence of student learning

Response provides evidence that includes the following:

• a loosely connected assessment, with partial description, based on its alignment with standards, learning goal(s), and student needs

sketchy data used as a baseline for student growth and related to the learning goal(s) of the lesson

• selection of a rubric/scoring guide that is loosely connected to the learning goal(s) and inconsistent communication of its use to students

• a vague choice of and rationale for a data-collection method to show evidence of student learning

Response provides evidence that includes the following:

• an appropriate assessment, with detailed description, based on its alignment with standards, learning goal(s), and student needs

appropriate data used as a baseline for student growth and related to the learning goal(s) of the lesson

• selection of a rubric/scoring guide that is aligned to the learning goal(s) and appropriate communication of its use to students

• an effective choice of and rationale for a data-collection method to show evidence of student learning

Response provides evidence that includes the following:

• a tightly connected assessment, with in-depth description, based on its alignment with standards, learning goal(s), and student needs

significant data used as a baseline for student growth and related to the learning goal(s) of the lesson

• selection of a rubric/scoring guide that is tightly connected to the learning goal(s) and insightful communication of its use to students

• a significant choice of and rationale for a data-collection method to show evidence of student learning

]

Narrator: The holistic section of the rubric is followed by the analytical section, shown in this slide. This section has a bullet for each guiding prompt in the textbox. Candidates can use this to self-assess the quality of their response. The qualitative words for each score point are shown in italics. Highlight the qualitative words throughout the document to become familiar with the characteristics of each score point.

On Screen: [Contextual Information]

Narrator: Let’s move on to review each part of the task 2. As with all the tasks, the candidate begins by providing contextual information about their classroom, resources, students, community and other factors that can affect teaching and learning. This is the first textbox the rater reviews during the scoring process.

On Screen: [Contextual Information Prompt

Contextual Information

This step allows you to provide a picture of your class that will enable the reader to better understand your instruction and decision-making skills.

Overview

Many factors can affect teaching and learning; these could include the community, the school district, and/or individual school/classroom/student factors.

The information you gather about your teaching and learning context and about your individual students will help provide perspective to the reader who will be scoring your submissions.

This part of your submission will not be scored, but the information you include should have implications regarding your instructional choices.

Your response must be limited to 1,500 characters (approximately one-half typed page). No artifacts can be attached to the Contextual Information textbox.

a) Describe your classroom. Include the grade level, content area, subject matter, and number of students. Provide relevant information about any of your students with special needs.

b) Describe any physical, social, behavioral, or developmental factors that may impact the instruction that occurs in your classroom. Mention any linguistic, cultural, or health considerations that may also impact teaching and learning in your classroom.

c) Describe any factors related to the school and surrounding community that may impact the teaching and learning that occurs in your classroom.]

Narrator: Primarily, this gives the rater any important background information that may be needed to understand the context of the response for this particular candidate.

The response to the contextual information prompt is not scored. No artifacts are required and the response text is limited to 1,500 characters.

On Screen: [Contextual Information Sample

a. The preschool classroom is comprised of 10 boys and 6 girls with an age range of 4–6 years old. Five of these children are on a current IEP, two of which are on a behavior plan. During the preschool morning, we work on developmentally appropriate skills such as socialization, manners, family style dining, and Pre-K skills (counting, measuring, phonology, alphabet awareness, developing pre-writing skills, fine motor, and gross motor).

b. The diversity of the classroom includes children that are Asian, Native American, divorced families, and low socioeconomic status. Children that exhibit behaviors are given warnings to correct their behavior. After two warnings, they must visit the think seat. The Asian child is fluently bilingual in two languages. A child from a divorced family needs transition time after switching homes; more reassurance during this transition time.

c. Preschools in this state are not mandated to attend prior to kindergarten. This preschool is a nonprofit organization and is funded by tuition paid for by parents, scholarships, among other income qualifying programs. Therefore, it is at the parent’s discretion to enroll their child in a Pre-K program, as well as the number of days their child attends. Due to funding, this preschool does not have technology in the classroom. The only technology utilized within this preschool classroom is a cassette player. This impacts my teaching by limiting my ability to include technology in the classroom.]

Narrator: Here is a sample Contextual Information response. This is representative of what we might see from candidates.

On Screen: [Breaking Down the Steps: Step 1

Step 1: Planning the Assessment

Step 2: Administering the Assessment and Analyzing the Data

Step 3: Reflecting

(an arrow points to Step 1)]

Narrator: Let’s move on to the first step in Task 2: Planning the Assessment

On Screen: [Step 1: [Textbox 2.1.1: Selecting a Single Assessment

Step 1: Planning the Assessment

This step allows you to demonstrate your knowledge of appropriate assessment tools that will meet student needs and the learning goal(s). This step should focus exclusively on planning for the assessment.

Textbox 2.1.1: Selecting a Single Assessment

Activity: Developing an Assessment

Select or design an assessment from a lesson that you have developed and will teach to your class. Your assessment should

· assess state and/or national content standards,

· assess the learning goal(s) for the lesson, and

· include a rubric or scoring guide.

Your assessment should also be able to produce quantitative or qualitative data to be used for analysis. Once the assessment is selected or designed, respond to the guiding prompts below.

Guiding Prompts

a) Provide an in-depth description of the assessment. Provide a rationale for choosing or designing the assessment based on its alignment with the standards and learning goal(s) that meet the students’ needs. (Two points to cover)

b) What data did you use to establish a baseline for student growth related to this lesson’s learning goal(s)? (One point to cover)

c) Describe the rubric or scoring guide you have selected or designed. How does it align to your learning goal(s)? How will you communicate its use to your students? (Three points to cover)

d) What evidence of student learning do you plan to collect from the assessment? How will you collect the data? Provide a rationale for your data-collection process. (Three points to cover)

Required artifacts for this textbox:

· representative pages of the selected assessment (maximum of two pages)

· the rubric or scoring guide (maximum of one page)

· the baseline data (maximum of two pages)

(an arrow points to this content and reads THREE ARTIFACTS TO ATTACH)]

Narrator: This are the prompts for the first textbox of the Task Requirements for Step 1. Candidates are encouraged to highlight the Task Requirements to help them become more aware of the activity and key words that they need to consider before they choose an assessment focus for this task.

As candidates are writing their response, they are encouraged to label the parts of their response a, b and c. It is not required, but it does help the candidate recognize where parts of the guiding prompts are missing or needing more evidence, and it helps to add clarity for a Rater who is scoring the response and looking for evidence that the candidate addressed each part of the guiding prompts.

Let’s look at the words in green and red. They have been highlighted green to draw your attention to the evidence that is needed by the candidate in the response. The red font is to indicate the type of writing the candidate will be required to provide.

On Screen: [Consider These Questions When Selecting an Assessment for This Task

Is the assessment chosen significant?

· Will your data-collection process provide quantitative and qualitative opportunities to collect, analyze, and discuss data and student growth in order to meet the learning goals?

· Does the assessment allow for opportunities for modifications to meet particular student needs (Focus Students)?

· Does the assessment generate a rubric/scoring guide that you can share with your students?

· Does the assessment allow for materials, resources, and technology to be used to administer the assessment?]

Narrator: Here are some questions that candidates should consider when selecting an assessment for this task. If candidates thoroughly read and dissect the entire task before attempting to complete it, they will be able to say “yes” to all of these questions. Note that the candidates must select an assessment robust enough to provide quality evidence for all aspects of the guiding prompts.

On Screen: [What do you think are some problems/challenges that we commonly see candidates submit for this task?]

Narrator: It is helpful for you to be aware of the types of problems or challenges we commonly see from candidates for this task.

Some of the issues we have seen with less accomplished responses include assessment choices that are not robust enough to produce the data for a substantive analysis. They also do not provide opportunities for specific and relevant modifications of the assessment for the focus students, or the rubrics are without substance (they are just an answer sheet).

Whatever assessment is the focus of this task, it must allow a candidate the opportunity to fully demonstrate his or her knowledge of assessment.

On Screen: [Step 1: Textbox 2.1.2: Preparing Learners for the Assessment

Textbox 2.1.2: Preparing Learners for the Assessment

Guiding Prompts

a) What learning activities and student groupings will you use during the assessment? Provide a rationale for your choices. (Two points to cover)

b) What materials, resources, and technology will you use to administer the assessment? Provide a rationale for your choices. (Two points to cover)]

Narrator: As you remember, we talked about the focus of Step 1, which is the PLANNING of this assessment.

So, when a candidate is choosing the assessment to administer, he or she must also consider this textbox’s prompts BEFORE choosing the assessment. This is the second textbox in Step 1, where the candidate is still in planning mode.

Both of the guiding prompts in this textbox are asking the candidate to talk about the assessment’s learning activities, groupings, materials, resources and technology he or she will be using as part of the assessment. Some candidates make the mistake of talking about the activities and materials, etc. that led up to the assessment, but these guiding prompts refer to the activities and materials of the assessment itself.

If the candidates can’t answer all of these prompts in the context of their assessment, then the choice of assessment is not a good one for this performance assessment.

The response for this textbox should reflect the activities, groupings, materials, resources and technology that a candidate is planning to use to assess student learning.

For example:

Learning activities could include assessment through such things as games, in-class presentations or student demonstrations.

Materials or resources are those tools that aid in the assessment of students based on the activities mentioned as being part of the candidate’s assessment, such as manipulatives or a computer-generated exam.

Remember: Whatever the candidate chooses, the responses for this textbox should all relate and be appropriate to the goal of the assessment.

Also, notice the multiple parts of each of these two guiding prompts. Rationales for your choices are also required.

On Screen: [Step 1: Textbox 2.1.3: The Two Focus Students

Textbox 2.1.3: The Two Focus Students

Guiding Prompts

a) Choose and describe two Focus Students who reflect different learning needs and for whom you will need to modify the assessment. Provide a rationale for selecting each of the students. Refer to them as Focus Student 1 and Focus Student 2 as you respond to the guiding prompts. (Four points to cover)

b) What data did you use to establish a baseline for growth for these two Focus Students? (Two points to cover)

c) Based on their specific learning needs, how will you modify the assessment for each of the two Focus Students? Provide a rationale for each decision. (Four points to cover)

Required artifacts for this textbox:

· a representative page of the data used to establish a baseline for Focus Student 1 (maximum of one page)

· a representative page of the data used to establish a baseline for Focus Student 2 (maximum of one page)

(an arrow points to this content and reads TWO ARTIFACTS TO ATTACH)]

Narrator: The choice of focus students for this particular prompt must be made with distinct parameters in mind. Each focus student must represent a different learning need and, depending on that learning need, the candidate must talk about how he or she will modify the assessment and the rationale for choosing that modification, which must be connected to each student’s particular learning need.

Within this textbox, the candidate must also provide two artifacts of one page each. Each artifact must show the data used to establish a baseline for each focus student. Remember, this is still Step 1 and the candidate is still in the planning stage, so the baseline for the focus student needs to be established at this point in order to later show academic growth.

On Screen: [Breaking Down the Steps: Step 2

Step 1: Planning the Assessment

Step 2: Administering the Assessment and Analyzing the Data

Step 3: Reflecting

(an arrow points to Step 2)]

Narrator: Let’s move on to the second step in Task 2: Administering the Assessment and Analyzing the Data

On Screen: [Step 2: Textbox 2.2.1: Analysis of the Assessment Data and Student Learning for the Whole Class

This step allows you to demonstrate your ability to administer an assessment and collect, record, and analyze the data.

Textbox 2.2.1: Analysis of the Assessment Data and Student Learning for the Whole Class

Activity: Administering and Analyzing the Assessment

· You will administer the selected assessment and then collect, record (in a graphic representation), and analyze the resulting data. Then respond to the guiding prompts below.

Guiding Prompts

a) Based on your baseline data and the data shown in your graphic representation, analyze the assessment data to determine your students’ progress toward the learning goal(s). (One point to cover)

b) How efficient was the data-collection process that you selected? Cite examples to support your analysis. (Two points to cover)

c) Describe how you engaged students in analyzing their own assessment results to help them understand their progress toward the learning goal(s). (One point to cover)

Required artifact for this textbox:

· the graphic representation (maximum of two pages)

(an arrow points to this content and reads ONE ARTIFACT TO ATTACH)]

Narrator: Now that the planning is complete, it is time to administer the assessment and then analyze the resulting data.

Note the response for textbox 2.2.1 is meant for the whole class. The two focus students will be discussed in the following textbox (2.2.2).

In the first textbox 2.2.1, the candidate is asked again to write about data in his or her written commentary. This time the candidate is analyzing the data that has been gathered after administering the assessment and comparing it to the baseline data from Step 1. This data is also shown as an artifact attachment in the form of a graphic organizer. Discussion and analysis of this graphic organizer artifact must appear in the written commentary, it must reference the “data” and this discussion MUST connect back to the learning goal(s).

The candidate must also discuss how efficient the data-collection process was for the assessment and cite specific examples to justify the analysis given in prompt “b.” If you remember in the prompt for textbox 2.1.1, the candidate is asked how he or she will be collecting data, based on the goals of the assessment. Now the candidate must analyze how appropriate this data-collection process was.

Finally, in prompt “c,” the candidate is asked to describe how the students were able to join in the analysis of their assessment, in regard to how they did, and to understand what that means in relation to the goals set for them.

Some candidates speak only of returning the assessment back to the students with a score at the top of the page. This would fall short of the main idea of this guiding prompt, that the candidate must involve the students to a much more interactive degree.

On Screen: [Step 2: Textbox 2.2.2: Analysis of the Assessment Data and Student Learning for Each of the Two Focus Students

Guiding Prompts

a) What did you learn overall about the progress of each of the two Focus Students toward achieving the learning goal(s)? Cite evidence from each of the two Focus Students’ completed assessment and any other related data to support your analysis. (Four points to cover)

b) Based on the assessment data, both baseline and graphic, what impact did your modification(s) of the assessment have on the demonstration of learning from each of the two Focus Students? Cite examples to support your analysis. (Four points to cover)

c) Describe how you engaged each of the two Focus Students in analyzing his or her own assessment results to help understand progress made toward the learning goal(s). (Two points to cover)

Required artifacts for this textbox:

· a completed assessment from Focus Student 1 (maximum of one page)

· a completed assessment from Focus Student 2 (maximum of one page)

(an arrow points to this content and reads TWO ARTIFACTS TO ATTACH)]

Narrator: Textbox 2.2.2 is solely focused on the two focus students. There are 10 points to cover in this textbox.

Note two things here:

Each focus student must be discussed separately, since they each had their own learning needs and modifications to the assessment. The candidate should note that the words “from each” were intentionally put in each guiding prompt to alert the candidate to speak about each focus student individually.

Also, the candidates must refer, in their written commentary, to the completed student assessment artifacts that are to be attached to this textbox, as they respond to the guiding prompts.

On Screen: [Breaking Down the Steps: Step 3

Step 1: Planning the Assessment

Step 2: Administering the Assessment and Analyzing the Data

Step 3: Reflecting

(an arrow points to Step 3)]

Narrator: The third and final step for Task 2 is called “Reflecting.”

Reflection is the thought process that occurs after the completion of an activity. This is the kind of thought process that allows a candidate to think deeply about what occurred — and what did not occur — during an event or situation, and to make decisions about how to approach similar situations in the future.

On Screen: [Step 3: Textbox 2.3.1: Reflecting on the Assessment for the Whole Class

This step allows you to reflect on the assessment by providing evidence of student learning that resulted from the baseline data and the results of the administered assessment.

Textbox 2.3.1: Reflecting on the Assessment for the Whole Class

Activity: Reflecting on Your Assessment

You will reflect on your assessment and the data you obtained from both the baseline data and the administered assessment and explain how it might inform your future instructional decisions for the whole class and for each of the two Focus Students. Then respond to the guiding prompts below.

Guiding Prompts

a) How will your data analysis inform or guide future instruction for the whole class? (One point to cover)

b) What modifications to the data-collection process would you make for future use? Provide a rationale. (Two points to cover)

c) What modifications to the assessment would you make for future use? Provide a rationale. (Two points to cover)

d) In what ways would an assessment that is different from the type used in this task allow students to further demonstrate their achievement of the learning goal(s)? (One point to cover)]

Narrator: Textbox 2.3.1 focuses on the candidate’s reflection on the assessment for the whole class.

Here the candidate will take into consideration all the data that has been collected and the administered assessment. The candidate will also consider what was successful and what may need improvement or what may need to be done differently. Rationales are an important point to cover in guiding prompts b and c. The candidate’s response should not be just a restatement of the things that happened but should be reflective as far as what happened and where things could be improved upon.

There are six points that should be reflected in the candidate’s response to this textbox.

On Screen: [Step 3: Textbox 2.3.2: Reflecting on the Assessment for the Two Focus Students

Guiding Prompts

a) Choose one successful aspect of the assessment for either Focus Student. Provide a rationale for your choice. (Two points to cover)

b) How will your data analysis inform or guide future instruction for each of the two Focus Students? (Two points to cover)

c) What modifications would you make to the assessment for future use for each of the two Focus Students? Provide a rationale. (Four points to cover)]

Narrator: The second textbox for Step 3, which is 2.3.2, is also about reflection, BUT it is focused on the two focus students and their successes during this assessment. Please note the number of points of evidence that need to be found for each guiding prompt.

Note that guiding prompt “a” asks for only ONE successful aspect of either focus student, but it also asks for a rationale for that success.

Guiding prompt “b” refers to the analysis of data that the candidate collected for each of the two focus students. In this textbox, the candidate must now connect that analysis from Step 2 to future instruction for EACH focus student.

Guiding prompt “c” asks the candidate to speak to future modifications to the assessment for each focus student and it should not be a repetition of what was already done. Instead, it should indicate thoughtful changes the candidate can make to further help the focus students demonstrate their learning. Remember, this is a reflection, so the more the candidate can make connections to previous goals, data, modifications, etc., the stronger the response will be.

There are eight points that should be reflected in the candidate’s response to this textbox.

On Screen: [Resources]

Narrator: That is the conclusion of Task 2 and its requirements.

Here is a quick reminder of some available resources.

On Screen: [Website

General Information: http://www.ets.org/ppa/test-takers/teachers/about

Tasks and Rubrics: http://www.ets.org/ppa/test-takers/teachers/build-submit/requirements

Ancillary Materials (Glossary, Lesson Plan Format, etc.): http://www.ets.org/ppa/test-takers/teachers/build-submit/ancillary-materials/

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): http://www.ets.org/ppa/test-takers/teachers/faq/

(an image displays the PPAT assessment website page)]

Narrator: Please visit the website for more information on PPAT. Included here are the links to that information.

On Screen: [Candidate and Educator Handbook http://www.ets.org/s/ppa/pdf/ppat-candidate-educator-handbook.pdf

(an image displays the PPAT Candidate and Educator Handbook table of contents)]

Narrator: We have prepared a handbook that covers the information shown above. Much of what we have shared about the tasks, rubrics and artifacts will be in the handbook.

It is paramount that teacher candidates read through the handbook before beginning the PPAT process. Resource documents provide basic information about the assessment and tasks to help ensure candidates are prepared to get started on the PPAT.

[END OF WEBINAR]