Resources

The Commission on Pathways Through Graduate School and Into Careers

In order for the United States to maintain its leadership role in global innovation and discovery, our country must continue to develop highly skilled human talent. The Commission on Pathways Through Graduate School and Into Careers, jointly sponsored by the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) and Educational Testing Service (ETS), guided a research effort examining issues on career pathways.

The 14-member Commission, composed of industry leaders, university presidents, graduate deans and provosts, identified the appropriate questions, data sources and experts to consult regarding:

  • Graduate student knowledge of career options
  • How students learn about career opportunities
  • The role of graduate programs and graduate faculty in informing and guiding students along the path to professional occupations
  • Career pathways that individuals with graduate degrees follow

The Commission's findings (PDF) were released on April 19, 2012, in Washington, D.C., and widely disseminated to universities, policymakers, employers and government agencies funding research and education.

The Commission is also engaged in creating a national conversation about why understanding career pathways for graduate students is important. Its efforts continue to address the critical need for innovators and experts in a wide range of fields that are essential to the success of the United States in the global economy.

To address the critical need for innovators and experts in a wide range of fields that are essential to America's success in the global economy, the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) and Educational Testing Service (ETS) convened a commission of academic and industry leaders to explore this important issue and to offer findings and policy recommendations. A report (PDF) on their effort was released at a forum at the U.S. Capitol on April 29, 2010.

In 2006, the nation turned its attention to accountability in higher education. As a leader in educational research and measurement, ETS added to the dialogue by examining the general topic of student learning outcomes. This examination resulted in a series of three reports in which ETS researchers identified the key issues of accountability and surveyed current practices in assessing student learning:

A Culture of Evidence: An Evidence-Centered Approach to Accountability for Student Learning Outcomes (PDF)

With higher education under increased pressure to prove accountability, ETS researchers developed a framework to improve, revise and introduce comprehensive systems for the collection and dissemination of information on student learning outcomes. This report presents a practical approach to help the educational community meet the call for accountability while respecting the diverse attributes of students, faculty and the institutions themselves. (Catherine M. Millett, David G. Payne, Carol A. Dwyer, Leslie M. Stickler, and Jon J. Alexiou, 2008.)

A Culture of Evidence: Critical Features of Assessments for Postsecondary Student Learning (PDF)

National dialogue on accountability in higher education focuses on improving student learning and engagement. To provide higher education stakeholders with a greater understanding of current assessment tools, ETS researchers take a detailed look at available measurements in this "30,000 foot" overview. (Catherine M. Millett, Leslie M. Stickler, David G. Payne, and Carol A. Dwyer, 2007.)

A Culture of Evidence: Postsecondary Assessment and Learning Outcomes (PDF)

To address the dearth of empirical data on student learning in higher education, ETS researchers take a macro look at current conditions affecting the postsecondary community. In this report, they provide an overview of the assessment landscape to outline accountability models and metrics used in higher education. (Carol A. Dwyer, Catherine M. Millett, and David G. Payne, 2006.)