Using the SuccessNavigator™ Assessment for Student Advising

People in this video

Narrators/commentators as noted below in text.

Narrator – Ross Markle, Senior Research and Assessment Advisor for the Educational Testing Service

 

Transcript Body

On-screen: [Using the SuccessNavigator™ Assessment for Student Advising. ETS® SuccessNavigator™]

Narrator – Ross Markle: We'll now go deeper into how the SuccessNavigator™ assessment can be used to help students succeed, starting with its primary intended use — student advising. To be clear, when we say advising, we don't necessarily mean the traditional 30- to 60-minute session that most students experience early in their college career. Moreover, we don't intend that the SuccessNavigator™ assessment be used only by advisors. This type of work with students can take place at any time — ideally over the course of a student's career — and can be done by many people on campus, including faculty, leaders from cocurricular programs, formal and informal mentors and administrators.

Regardless of one's role at an institution or the context in which they work with students, many colleges and universities lack a holistic set of indicators that cover the broad range of factors that impact student success. Moreover, many indicators that we do use, such as first-generation status or high school GPA, don't speak directly to the skills or behaviors that impact student success — they merely serve as proxies that suggest students' likelihood for success.

On-Screen: [Advising:

Next, we'll discuss how the SuccessNavigator™ assessment provides important information to faculty and staff that facilitate student interactions in two key ways. First, the SuccessNavigator™ assessment Success Indices indicate students' likelihood for success, allowing advisors to identify which students need significant, early and intrusive interventions and target their work accordingly. Other students with higher likelihoods of success can still benefit from engagement, but likely require a different type of interaction.

Second, by using general skill and subskill scores, along with the materials provided in the Resource Library, advisors can target the right intervention for each student. This allows each student to have a personalized plan based on the factors that matter most to their success.

Let's first talk about targeting interventions based on students' likelihood for success. Here, we see 10 students and their Academic and Retention Success scores.

On-Screen: [1. Collecting Student Scores:

Student # Academic Success Retention Success
1 LOW MODERATE
2 MODERATE HIGH
3 MODERATE LOW
4 LOW MODERATE
5 HIGH HIGH
6 MODERATE MODERATE
7 HIGH HIGH
8 MODERATE LOW
9 LOW LOW
10 MODERATE MODERATE

]

We can then organize these students based on their likely success so that we can identify those that need the most significant, early and intrusive interaction. However, it is important to consider that each student can benefit from cocurricular engagement. Granted, students in the red box here are an important target for intervention.

On-Screen: [2. Organizing Students:

Student # Academic Success Retention Success
TOP (RED BOX): Intrusive interventions, continuous monitoring
8 MODERATE LOW
9 LOW LOW
3 MODERATE LOW
4 LOW MODERATE
1 LOW MODERATE
MIDDLE (YELLOW BOX): Resource library, connections, check-ins
6 MODERATE MODERATE
10 MODERATE MODERATE
2 MODERATE HIGH
BOTTOM (GREEN BOX): Campus leaders, peer mentors
5 HIGH HIGH
7 HIGH HIGH

]

However, students in the middle box still face particular hurdles. Advisors might want to follow up with these students regularly, recommending the tools and resources that the SuccessNavigator™ assessment provides.

Additionally, students in the green box may require a different type of engagement altogether. They might hold leadership roles on campus or serve as peer mentors to other students.

Let's consider an individual student, Julia. She's a new student who has enrolled full time as a business major, and given her background, is considered a first-generation college student.

Although her high school GPA was relatively strong, her standardized test scores were low, placing her in remedial math and English courses.

Julia is also working full time. This, in addition to her first-generation status, leaves her with little social support for her educational pursuits. Given these disadvantages, there are several forms of support that could benefit Julia. Without some intervention, Julia will likely face both academic and persistence challenges.

On-Screen: [Information on Julia:

Academic Preparation

Notes:
Julia is working full time while also taking a 15-credit course load. Thus, her financial and work responsibilities are likely to limit her ability to focus on academics and interact with other students. With both modest academic and social support in her college endeavor, she would benefit from engaging with formal (e.g., tutoring, advising) and informal (e.g., peer-mentoring) resources on campus.

Outcomes (without intervention)
GPA: 2.2
Persistence: Withdraw after first semester]

When we see Julia's SuccessNavigator™ Score Report, we see a few key factors that tell us her story.

First, we see that Julia has a moderate likelihood of academic and persistence success. This is because she has several positive characteristics — namely her high school GPA and Academic Skills — as well as several challenges — namely her Social Support and her standardized test scores.

Because of these strong academic skills, Julia also receives a recommendation for acceleration to higher levels of math and English. The ability to manage her work, attend class and complete assignments will be a strength throughout her college career.

On-Screen: [Course Acceleration Scores: Math: Yes; English: Yes]

However, her biggest challenge from a noncognitive perspective is her Social Support. Her work obligations and lack of family support pose a threat to her success. Here, we see recommendations for her to engage with the Office of Student Life.

Based on these characteristics, Julia should focus on programs, activities and resources that address her areas of need. Let's discuss a few of the materials in the SuccessNavigator™ assessment's Resource Library that might benefit Julia.

First, the "Choosing a College and Career Path" checklist is helpful for aligning a student's academic success with their ultimate career goals. The hope here is that Julia understands the value of her degree, commits to her academic goals and maintains her focus on college even while working full time.

Julia also has access to the "Where to Seek Help" guide, which talks about help seeking as an adaptive behavior for college students. By understanding this, Julia will become more likely to use campus resources as supports, given that she may have fewer supports at home.

In conclusion, the SuccessNavigator™ assessment helps tell Julia's story from a holistic, skill- and behavior-based perspective. We can not only identify her social and contextual issues and her likelihood for success, but the Advisor Report provides targeted feedback and action plans to structure interactions with Julia.

On-Screen: [ETS® SuccessNavigator™. We're here to help. For additional guidance, please call 1-800-745-0269 or visit successnavigator.org.

[END]