Video Title: The TOEFL® Test Advantage for Score Users - Video transcript

People in this video

Narrator

Donald Martin – Special Asst. to the Provost, Columbia Teachers College

Sasha Johnson – ESL Teacher, University of Oklahoma

Robert Watkins –Asst. Director, Graduate and International Admissions, University of Texas at Austin

Shahriar – Engineering Student from Bangladesh

Luzia Tatari – Coordinator of International Recruitment, Ferris State University

Minh – Global Studies student from Vietnam

Teresa Sanchez-Lazer – Executive Director - TOEFL Program, Educational Testing Service

Pablo Garcia Gomez – Test Developer - TOEFL Program, Educational Testing Service

Ahmadu Kawu – Test Developer - TOEFL Program, Educational Testing Service

Eileen Tyson – Director of Client Relations - TOEFL Program, Educational Testing Service

Samba Dieng – International Admissions Counselor, University of Illinois at Springfield

Lisa Igram – Director of International Student Programs, Hope International University

Joshua Prigge – Dep. Director Global Exchange, Soonchunhyang University, South Korea

Hikaru – Engineering Student from Japan

Intro

[music playing]

On-screen: ETS® TOEFL®

Donald Martin (Special Asst. to the Provost, Columbia Teachers College): Obviously, we want students who can understand the language to communicate effectively, but we found that TOEFL results are a very, very good indicator for us of someone's ability to do that.

Sasha Johnson (ESL Teacher, University of Oklahoma): It's integrative. It makes them do a variety of skills that are useful in a classroom and in their jobs further beyond the education.

Robert Watkins (Asst. Director, Graduate and International Admissions, University of Texas at Austin): It takes the four skills. It integrates them in such a way that in each of the sections, you have to use all of those skills again and again and again, and for us that's more getting out the realistic in-class performance.

Shahriar (Engineering Student from Bangladesh): The best thing about the TOEFL test that I found was how it uses four tools of communication: reading, writing, speaking and listening.

Luzia Tatari (Coordinator of International Recruitment, Ferris State University): The TOEFL test is a great tool for the students first of all because it is available everywhere. The students have the opportunity to take it near to their homes.

Minh (Global Studies Student from Vietnam): The TOEFL test was a very helpful way to get me prepared for communicating at college level.

On-screen: The TOEFL® Test Advantage

Narrator: Among admissions officers recently surveyed and who expressed a preference, four out of five preferred the TOEFL test over other English language tests. Respondents also indicated that they were significantly more satisfied with the TOEFL test than with other tests because it does the best job of assessing English-language proficiency.

Teresa Sanchez-Lazer (Executive Director - TOEFL Program, Educational Testing Service): The TOEFL program is the absolute and foremost leader in academic assessment of English-language proficiency. The test is founded in an extensive research base. We work on an ongoing basis with experts, both academic and advisories who represent admissions officers in many countries.

Pablo Garcia Gomez (Test Developer - TOEFL Program, Educational Testing Service): It was very important at the design stage to know, to have a clear understanding what students need to do in the classroom. So, a good part of this research agenda was dedicated to develop this understanding.

Ahmadu Kawu (Test Developer - TOEFL Program, Educational Testing Service): The test or this case; the language case of listening, reading, speaking and writing, and it does it in such a way that it simulates an environment that students experience in the classroom. I don't think any other test out there does that much.

On-screen: Admissions officers are more satisfied with the TOEFL test because:

Narrator: The TOEFL test provides more accurate scores to better differentiate between test takers.

On-screen: Centralized scoring helps ensure test security and accuracy

Eileen Tyson (Director of Client Relations - TOEFL Program, Educational Testing Service): The way the TOEFL test does its scoring sets it apart from any other English-proficiency test. First of all, we have a clear separation between the testing center and the scoring process. We don't do scoring in the test center for reasons of security, and for the integrity of the scores, it's better to have the scoring done separately.

On-screen: The TOEFL Speaking and Writing sections are scored by professionally trained raters.

Teresa Sanchez-Lazer: The constructed-response scoring — that is, the scoring for speaking and writing — is very important in anchoring the quality of our tests. We believe we are more fair because each candidate's responses are scored by multiple people, and it's not the person who delivered the assessments.

On-screen: TOEFL test raters are checked before every scoring session.

Eileen Tyson: We don't just check our raters once or twice a year. We check them every single time they do a scoring session.

On-screen: The TOEFL test combines e-rater® automated scoring and human judgment to produce better-quality scores.

Teresa Sanchez-Lazer: And in addition, for the writing test, we employ a combination of the e-rater engine plus human raters.

Eileen Tyson: ETS is the world's leader in automated scoring, but we're very careful in how we use it. We make sure to have a balance between human and automated scoring in order to provide the most objective, reliable results.

On-screen: Admissions officers are more satisfied with the TOEFL test because:

Narrator: The TOEFL test is more available and accessible to test takers worldwide.

On-screen: More than 4,500 testing locations in 165 countries.

Eileen Tyson: There are more TOEFL test centers than all other English-proficiency tests combined. There are more than 4,500 test centers available to students in 165 countries.

On-screen: Accepted by more than 7,500 institutions in 130 countries.

Teresa Sanchez-Lazer: The TOEFL test is almost like a passport. It's accepted by over 7,500 institutions in 130 different countries. We also know that those institutions recognize the quality of the TOEFL test.

Samba Dieng (International Admissions Counselor, University of Illinois at Springfield): Based on experience we've seen students that perform well on the TOEFL tend to do better academically once they get to campus.

Lisa Igram (Director of International Student Programs, Hope International University): The TOEFL test ensures that students who come to Hope are able to succeed academically in their classes in the undergraduate or graduate school.

Joshua Prigge (Dep. Director Global Exchange, Soonchunhyang University): There's lots of tests available, but for the most options, the most places you want to go, you should take the TOEFL test.

Hikaru (Engineering Student from Japan): I think the TOEFL test was some sort of measure for me to understand how much English I've learned in my life compared to other people who hadn't had the same experience as I had.

Shahriar (Engineering Student from Bangladesh): I'm still learning, to be honest, and I don't know when this learning will end, but I'm enjoying it.

On-screen: The TOEFL® Test Advantage

All of the comments in this video from members of the higher education community were gathered independently from the survey of admissions officers.

Narrator: All of the comments in this video from members of the higher education community were gathered independently from the survey of admissions officers.

[END]

Total length of video: 5:40