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Appropriate TOEIC® Test Use

TOEIC® scores can be used to make fair and equitable decisions that reflect the needs and priorities of score users such as managers and English-language instructors.

Evidence: We provide specific illustrations, tools and guidance that allow score users to:

  • better understand their English requirements
  • correctly interpret the TOEIC scores
  • make fair and equitable decisions

For example, a manager's decision to promote a specific candidate based on his or her English skills relies on an understanding of the skills needed as well as on setting a cutscore that reflects their needs and priorities. Only with both can the manager maximize a positive outcome — choosing a candidate with the right English skills who can succeed in that position.

  • Cover of Setting Standards on the TOEIC® Listening and Reading Test and the TOEIC® Speaking and Writing Tests: A Recommended Procedure

    Setting Standards on the TOEIC® Listening and Reading Test and the TOEIC® Speaking and Writing Tests: A Recommended Procedure

    Employers often use TOEIC test scores as one source of information to make a number of decisions. These include:

    • recruitment of new employees
    • movement of current employees into jobs that require English-language skills
    • placement of employees into English-language training programs

    Read more about Setting Standards on the TOEIC Listening, Reading, Speaking and Writing Tests

  • Cover of Best Practices for Comparing TOEIC® Speaking Test Scores to Other Assessments and Standards: A Score User’s Guide

    Best Practices for Comparing TOEIC® Speaking Test Scores to Other Assessments and Standards: A Score User’s Guide

    In order to better understand the meaning of test scores and to facilitate decision making, score users may need to understand how scores from two different tests are related. The relationship between scores from two different tests are typically summarized in a “concordance table” that indicates the correspondence between the scores on the two tests. Unfortunately, some concordance tables are produced and distributed without any research support, which can lead to inaccurate and unfair decisions about test takers.

    Read more about Best practices for comparing TOEIC Speaking test scores to other assessments and standards: A score user’s guide

  • Cover of Insights into Using TOEIC® Scores to Inform Human Resource Management Decisions

    Insights into Using TOEIC® Scores to Inform Human Resource Management Decisions

    This study provided preliminary insights into how TOEIC® scores are used to inform personnel on decisions related to the hiring, promotion and training of employees. The ultimate objective was to support appropriate test score use and meaningful score-based interpretations in order to facilitate human resource management decisions.

    The study results revealed examples of how managers use scores to inform human resource management decisions. The report concludes by providing suggestions for future research, to develop score user services and to continue a discussion on how TOEIC test scores may inform decisions related to human resource management.

    Read more about Insights into Using TOEIC Test Scores to Inform Human Resource Management Decisions

  • Cover of Linking OPIc Levels to TOEIC® Speaking Scores

    Linking OPIc Levels to TOEIC® Speaking Scores

    An important aspect of test validity is the appropriateness of the interpretation and usage of test scores. Caution is needed when comparing scores on two tests, such as the OPIc (Korea) test and the TOEIC® Speaking test, which have different content. The inappropriate comparison between the scores of different tests may lead to unfair decision making. This study compared scores on the OPIc test and the TOEIC Speaking test. Given the results of this study, to prevent invalid and unfair comparison, especially near the top of the two test scales, the scores of the two tests should not be interpreted as equivalent or interchangeable.

    Read more about Linking OPIc Levels to TOEIC Speaking Scores

  • Cover of Mapping TOEIC® Test Scores to the STANAG 6001 Language Proficiency Levels

    Mapping TOEIC® Test Scores to the STANAG 6001 Language Proficiency Levels

    STANAG 6001 is a NATO Standardization Agreement which describes explicit listening, speaking, reading and writing proficiency levels necessary for military personnel. This study aimed to identify which minimum scores for each of the TOEIC tests' four skill areas correspond to the different STANAG proficiency levels. Thus, this study provides guidance to score users who need to make decisions about language proficiency based on achievement of STANAG proficiency levels.

    Read more about Mapping TOEIC Test Scores to the STANAG 6001 Language Proficiency Levels

  • The Case of Taiwan: Perceptions of College Students about the Use of TOEIC® Tests to Graduate

    This study examines test taker perceptions about the use of the TOEIC test as one of the college English-language exit tests of Taiwan's higher education institutions. The results suggest that the use of TOEIC test scores as a requirement for graduation has a positive impact on language learning. Such test use has also proven to be in line with the intended use of the TOEIC test: To prepare test takers to gain a competitive edge in the job market.

    Read more The Case of Taiwan: Perceptions of College Students about the Use of TOEIC Tests to Graduate

  • Cover of The Case for a Comprehensive, Four-Skill Assessment of English-Language Proficiency

    The Case for a Comprehensive, Four-Skill Assessment of English-Language Proficiency

    This paper explains how four-skill language testing is the best way to evaluate whether someone can communicate in English, and explains how this approach can:

    • result in a fairer way of assessment for test takers
    • improve the quality of test users' decisions
    • create more positive impact for decision makers, teachers and learners

    Read more about The Case for a Comprehensive, Four-Skill Assessment of English-Language Proficiency